Developing Good Email Habits

good emailing habits

Good email habits reflect well on us, improve our public perception, and increase the chance of a prompt and comprehensive response. Here is a list to help you brush up on some essential email etiquette rules:

Never write and quickly send off an angry email

Venting your spleen in an angry, hostile reply to someone may make you feel good, but it is almost never a good idea to send such an email. Take your time and cool down. Then, if you have written something you are not sure about, wait until the following day so that you can re-read it before sending.

Take time to send your messages to the right people

Before you click “Reply All” or put names on the “Cc” or “Bcc” lines, ask yourself if all the recipients need the information in your message. If they do not, why send it? Do not hit “Reply All” unless every member on the email chain needs to know. You want to make sure that you are not sending everyone on a list your answer – you may create unnecessary traffic.

Evaluate the importance of your e-mail

Do not overuse the high priority option. If you overuse this feature, few people will take it seriously. A better solution is to use descriptive subject lines that explain exactly what a message is about.

Do not forward internal communication to a third-party without modifying the previous messages

If a third-party needs to be involved in the conversation, do not be lazy and write a brand new email with relevant information and add necessary recipients to “Cc”. If you must forward the previous conversation, edit it to remove any confidential information, unnecessary expressions of emotion, etc. Even internally it is not a good idea to forward a previous conversation without looking through it and considering the reaction some statements might bring. Sending unedited conversation to a third-party is simply unprofessional.

Interested in writing a business email? Read our blog on it here.